Scalloped Cédrat dress

Being completely charmed by the Coquelicot pattern from the talented Dessine Moi Un Patron, I was happy to discover another free pattern at the Mode et Travaux magazine! You can download it here: Caraco Cédrat.

It’s the perfect summer top with subtle details that make it stand out from the ordinary: little bows to attach the shoulder bands and well-designed inserts at the front and back. Wanting to emphasize this nice design I decided to make a scalloped border.

First, I made a muslin out of a cotton voile from Les Coupons de Saint Pierre, which, to my happiness, is pretty wearable in the end. Perfect for when it’s another heat wave again (and again: living in the South of France can be pretty challenging for someone from Belgium). Besides adding a scalloped border, I also enlarged the front and back insert.

 

Next, I made a dress in a fabric that I had leftover from the tulip top I made before. It’s a cotton-polyester mix from Tissus Bennytex with a little denim effect, but much lighter to wear. Perfect for summer! I added a scalloped border but I didn’t enlarge the inserts. Even though I liked the effect on the top I was too afraid it would look like I was nine months pregnant again.

Cedrat the dress

Since I took some pictures during the sewing process, I’ll show you a little step-by-step of how I proceeded (unfortunately I didn’t take pictures of the modifications made on paper, so I hope it is clear with my cut fabric pieces).

PATTERN PIECES

The explained modifications were done on the paper pattern pieces before cutting the fabric

1 and 4) I added a scalloped border to the original front and back upper pattern piece (“Cédrat buste devant au pli” and “Cédrat buste dos au pli”) so that they will overlap the corresponding lining piece.

2 and 5) For the lining I took the original upper front and back pattern piece (“Cédrat buste devant au pli” and “Cédrat buste dos au pli”) without any modification.

3 and 6) To make a scalloped hem on the upper front and back pattern piece, I cut a corresponding border with 2 cm seam allowance included.Dia1Dia2

7 and 8) To make a dress out of the original pattern, I measured my hip circumference (H). Then, I adjusted the width of the border of the original pattern piece as follows: H/4 + 1 cm (“Cédrat devant empiècement au pli” and “Cédrat dos empiècement au pli”). This will add 4 cm in total to the hip circumference of the dress. To match this new border width, I rounded the side of the original pattern piece. Then I just drew a straight line downwards for the bottom part of the dress (up to the desired length of the dress).

Cédrat dress
The green line corresponds to the border of the original pattern piece. I only modified the width of this border so it would fit my hip circumference. I rounded the side of the original pattern piece to match this new border line (red curved line). For the bottom part of the dress I just drew a straight line from this border line up to the desired length of the dress (red straight line).

ASSEMBLY

  • Sew the darts in the front pattern pieces (1 and 2). Unfortunately my darts are not very nice. I redid them twice but they stay quite visible…
  • Finish the raw edges of pieces 3 and 6 (that’s why I included the 2 cm seam allowance).
  • Sew piece 3 to 1 and 6 to 4, right sides together, and trim excess fabric so that the scallops looks nice when turned to the right side. I topstitched the rounded border of the scallops.

IMG_2367

  • Sew the lining to the upper pattern pieces right sides together: neckline, armpit and shoulder bands, but not the sides. Finish the seams and turn to the right side. I also topstitched the edges because I liked the effect.
  • Sew the bottom pieces of the dress (7 and 8) to the lining of the upper pieces (2 and 5) wrong sides together so that the scalloped hem of pieces 1 and 4 will cover the seam. I found it a bit tricky to sew these parts together due to the V-shape of the pattern pieces. To finish, I sewed the seam flat to the lining so it would stay in place.
  • Sew the sides of the dress together. I did this using French seams for a clean finish. It’s funny how these are called French seams in English and “coutures anglaises” (English seams) in French.
  • Hem the border of the dress and it’s done!!

I hope these explanations were a bit clear and if you have questions don’t hesitate!

 

Here’s a little impression of the dress in the French countryside. It’s a bit creased after a day of wear (as am I 😉 ), but I’m very happy with this new dress in my wardrobe!

And here it is when it just left the ironing board:

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